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K-5 WRITING #3

Write Aloud: Beginning A Rough Draft

Grades 1-2

 

 

Writing

 

Common Core State Standards

• W.1.3 Write narratives in which they recount two or more appropriately sequenced events, include some details regarding what happened, use temporal words to signal event order, and provide some sense of closure.
• W.2.3 Write narratives in which they recount a well-elaborated event or short sequence of events, include details to describe actions, thoughts, and feelings, use temporal words to signal event order, and provide a sense of closure.

Rationale

Often students think that the first message they write should be the finished product. In learning the writing process, the rough draft stage is where students need to learn to get ideas down on paper and not be focused on the appearance of the writing.

 

Materials

  • Chart paper and marker

 

Direct Explanation

When we first write a story, we focus on getting down on paper everything we want to say. This is called writing a ‘rough draft’ because it is our first try at writing our ideas. Sometimes it looks a little rough because we aren’t worried about what it looks like. The words might not be spelled right. Maybe we leave out capital letters and periods at the end of our sentences. Later, we’ll come back and fix everything so another person could read it easily, but right now, we just want to get our ideas out of our heads and onto the paper as fast as we can.

I am going to show you what it looks like when a person writes a ’rough draft’.”

 

Model

1. “Yesterday, I told you my story of a time when I got stuck in a tree as a little girl. Today I want to show you how I would write that into a story that you could read. (Briefly review the story that you told before.) Listen as I think out loud and write my story. Check to see if it sounds like the story I told you yesterday.”

 

2. Write on chart paper with a marker. Think aloud as you write each word. Think aloud about remembering to put spaces between words and sound out words that would not be well known by the students. Model re-reading what you write before writing a new word.

 

When I was a little girl, I liked to climb trees. One day I climbed a tree. Then my foot got stuck. I tried to get it out, but it would not come out. I called for help, but no one heard me. Then Mr. Martin came home from work. When he got out of his car, I yelled. He got his ladder and climbed up to me. He helped me get my foot out so I could go home.”

 

3. Re-read the story when finished. “Does that sound like the story I told you yesterday? When writing the rough draft, all you think about is getting the story on paper. Did you notice that I used a pen and not a pencil? I want the story to get out of my head and onto the paper as fast as I can. When I made mistakes, I just crossed them out and kept on writing. If I have an eraser, then I think I should fix my mistakes right away. I will fix my mistakes later.”

 

 

Guided Practice

Students will write a rough draft of the story they told yesterday in small groups. They will use a black or blue pen to write with and will cross out mistakes and keep writing, as needed. During the sharing, they should read their draft aloud to the same group to check if the written version is similar to the oral story.

 

 

Independent Practice

Students will independently write a rough draft of their message before attempting to revise or edit and publish. It should be written in ink and not expected to be a finished piece until it has been revised and edited and then published.

 

Assessment

When the teacher checks the students’ writing journals, evidence of rough drafts should be visible. The teacher should observe sentences written in ink with mistakes crossed out. Remember, not all rough drafts have to be taken completely through the writing process.

 

Tier II Additions

  • Have students independently write a rough draft of their message, after extra-guided practice in small groups, before attempting to revise or edit and publish. It should be written in ink and not expected to be a finished piece until it has been revised and edited and then published.

Assessment

When the teacher checks the students writing journals, evidence of rough drafts should be visible. The teacher should observe sentences written in ink with mistakes crossed out. Remember, not all rough drafts have to be taken through the writing process.

 

Tier III Accommodations/Modifications

  • Have students independently write a rough draft of their message, after extra-guided practice in a one-on-one situation, before attempting to revise or edit and publish. It should be written in ink and not expected to be a finished piece until it has been revised and edited and then published.

Assessment

When the teacher checks the students’ writing journals, evidence of rough drafts should be visible. The teacher should observe sentences written in ink with mistakes crossed out. Remember, not all rough drafts have to be taken through the writing process.

 

Tier IV Modifications

  • Use any previous accommodations/modifications that are applicable.

  • Allow student to work with another student /paraprofessional/teacher/adult volunteer to write a rough draft of their message before attempting to revise or edit and publish. It should be written in ink and not expected to be a finished piece until it has been revised and edited and then published.

 

Assessment

When the teacher checks the students’ writing journals, evidence of rough drafts should be visible. The teacher should observe sentences written in ink with mistakes crossed out. Remember, not all rough drafts have to be taken through the writing process.

 

Tier V Modifications

  • Use any previous accommodations/modifications that are applicable.

  • Allow student may use computer for writing their rough draft.

  • Allow student to work with another student /paraprofessional/teacher/adult volunteer to write a rough draft of their message before attempting to revise or edit and publish.

  • Student may orally give their rough draft to another to transcribe.

 

Assessment

When the teacher checks the students’ writing journals, evidence of rough drafts should be visible. The teacher should observe sentences written in ink with mistakes crossed out. Remember, not all rough drafts have to be taken through the writing process.

 

 

 

Resources

Apprenticeship In Literacy. Dorn and French

Scaffolding Young Writers. Dorn and Soffos

 

Copyright © 2006 Arkansas Department of Education. All rights reserved. School districts may reproduce these materials for in-school student use only. No resale. Materials may not be reproduced, distributed or sold for commercial use or profit. ADE employees are not authorized to waive these restrictions.

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