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K-5 WRITING #1

Modeled Writing: Spacing Between Words

Grades K-1

 

Writing

 

Common Core State Standards

• RF.K.1 Demonstrate understanding of the organization and basic features of print.
              c. Understand that words are separated by spaces in print.

 

 

Rationale

In modeled writing, the teacher writes the message or story. It may be a personal experience, daily news, or from oral language interaction with students. Model Writing provides the opportunity to demonstrate the writer’s thinking out loud. In this lesson, the teacher will model writing a sentence without spacing between words and then the same sentence with spacing to demonstrate how spacing enables one to better read what is written.

 

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Materials

  • Big Book for shared reading

  • Sentence strips

  • Highlighter

  • Scissors

 

Direct Explanation

“Many times it is hard for others to read our story because we write our words too closely together. Spacing is very important when you write. We are going to really take a close look at how important those spaces are!”

 

Model

  1. Read a big book with one line of text per page and exaggerated spacing between words. “This book is easy for me to read because the author put spaces between the words.” Point out the spaces.

  2. Show the children a sentence strip with six of their names written on it without spaces. Ask the children to read it. This will probably be difficult. Each child may be able to pick out his own name. Cut each name apart and put them in a pocket chart exaggerating the spaces between them. Discuss how much easier it is to read words with spaces in between.

  3. Show a sentence that is written on a sentence strip that has no spaces between the words. Use a yellow highlighter and mark the places where the sentence needs spaces. Then re-write the sentence on another sentence strip modeling correct spacing. Show the children that the second one with correct spacing is easier to read.

4. Remind students that leaving spaces between their words when they write will make it much easier for others to read.

 

Guided Practice

Today when you go back to write, I want you to read a story you have written in your journal. Check the spacing with your finger to see if you have spaced enough. Use a yellow highlighter to mark the places where you need a space. Write the sentence again and put the space in. Read your sentence one more time.” Students will choose a sentence in their journal to check for spacing.

Using a yellow highlighter, they will mark the places where spaces are needed.

They will re-write the sentence with the correct spacing.

 

Independent Practice
  • Students will use spacing between words as they write so their writing will be easier to read. Students will independently check their writing for spacing.

 

Assessment

Look for evidence of spacing between words in the students writing journals.

 

Tier II Additions

  • Have students use their finger/or “Space Men” between each word to help with spacing so their writing will be easier to read. (Space Men markers are plastic space men placed at the end of each word to provide a cue for proper spacing between words).

 

 

Assessment

Look for evidence of spacing between words in the students’ writing journals.

 

Tier III Accommodations/Modifications

  • Have students use “Space Men” to space between words in their writing journals. (Space Men markers are plastic space men placed at the end of each word to provide a cue for proper spacing between words).

 

 

Assessment

Look for evidence of spacing between words in the students writing journals.

 

Tier IV Modifications
  • Have student use “Space Men” to space between words in their writing journals in a small group setting.

 

Assessment

Look for evidence of spacing between words in the students writing journals.

 

Tier V Modifications
  • Help student learn one-to-one correspondence by using colored blocks or other placeholder for words in a sentence.

  • Use word cards (with pictures) to build sentences to help with concept of one-to-one correspondence for words in a sentence.

  • Have student use “Space Men” to space between words in their writing journals in a 1:1 setting with a paraprofessional, teacher, or parent volunteer.

 

Assessment

Look for evidence of spacing between words in the students writing journals.

 

 

 

Resources

Dorn and French, Apprenticeship In Literacy.

 

Copyright © 2006 Arkansas Department of Education. All rights reserved. School districts may reproduce these materials for in-school student use only. No resale. Materials may not be reproduced, distributed or sold for commercial use or profit. ADE employees are not authorized to waive these restrictions.

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