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K-5 WRITING #10

Mini lesson: Editing- Editing By Ear For End Punctuation and Beginning Capitalization

Grades 2-5

 

 

 

Writing

 

Common Core State Standards

L.2.2 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
L.3.2 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
L.4.2 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
L.5.2 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

 

Rationale

Students need to hear when vocal changes would indicate sentences requiring different punctuation. For example, raising pitch would indicate a question and would require a question mark. When the sentence ends, students should indicate the next word needs a capital letter.

 

Materials

  • Chart paper

  • I Finally Got It” (see end of lesson for this story)

  • Any poem, Big Book, short story or other written message that contain a variety of ending punctuation

 

Direct Explanation

Gather students in front of an easel. Tell students that you are going to show them an easy way to edit for end punctuation and beginning capitalization. “In our writing we will be looking for places to add periods, question marks and exclamation marks. Each new sentence will begin with a capital letter.”

(Note: In second grade, you may want to restrict the exercise to only one end punctuation mark: periods. Older students can keep track of other marks as well.)

 

Model

Ask the students to listen as you read orally from the Big Book. Read declarative sentences with a slight voice drop, questions with a rise and pause, and exclamations with a rise and more volume. As you reach the end of each sentence, point out the end punctuation and that the next sentence begins with a capital letter. Continue, encouraging the students to join in chorally. Continue reading until most of the students get the connection between the sound of their voice and the end punctuation. Now take the Big Book from the easel, so that the students cannot see the text. Ask the students to snap their fingers when they hear the end of a sentence. Have students name the appropriate end punctuation mark. Continue reading aloud to them. Discuss how your voice sounds when you reach the periods, question marks, or exclamation points.

 

 

Guided Practice

  1. Read a text such as “I Finally Got It!” The class will listen for complete sentences. The students will snap their fingers to signal the end and then discuss the appropriate mark. Show the students the way you edited the piece for ending punctuation. (You can use editing symbols or cross-out and write in the spaces between lines.) Remind them to check that each new sentence begins with a capital letter. One way to do that is to take a yellow highlighter and mark the beginnings of all the sentences and then change whatever is needed.

  2. Now have all the students try this kind of editing in peer partnerships or groups. Ask partnerships or groups if they found any missing end punctuation.

  3. Ask students to point out the sentences where end punctuation was missing. Commend the students for finding places that needed end punctuation.

  4. Remind them that after a sentence ends, the next sentence should begin with a capital letter.

  5. Emphasis on their successes as editors.

 

Independent Practice

Students will independently edit a piece of their own writing for end punctuation and beginning capitalization. They will mark the errors and write the corrections in the spaces between the lines.

 

Assessment

Evidence should be visible in the student’s writing, showing that the student knows how to edit for end punctuation and beginning capitalization.

 

Tier II Additions

  • Have students place punctuation marks on cards at the end of appropriate sentences through modeling and classroom participation.

  • Use sentence strips and put in end punctuation marks appropriately.

  • Have students select words at the beginning to be capitalized using peer partners, modeling, and highlighting words.

 

Assessment

Evidence should be visible in the student’s writing, showing that the student knows how to edit for end punctuation and beginning capitalization.

 

 

 

 

Tier III Accommodations/Modifications

  • Students will select end marks, introducing one end mark per exercise.

  • Student will use different modalities to select end mark (clapping) using only one mark per exercise.

  • Play the story on tape while the class views the story on chart paper, big book, as teacher exaggerates the ending. Use this for each punctuation mark.

  • Use alphabet cards, alphabet tiles or other manipulatives over the letters that should be capitalized at the beginning of each new sentence.

 

Assessment

Students’ writing notebook should show evidence of ending punctuation and capitalization.

 

Tier IV and V Modifications

  • Use any previously mentioned accommodation/modification that is appropriate.

  • Allow smaller group instruction and/or extra time and more frequent practice.

Assessment

Student’s writing notebook should show evidence of ending punctuation and capitalization.

 

 

 

Resource

Freeman, Marcia (1995). Building a Writing Community. Gainesville,

Florida: Maupin House.

 

Copyright © 2006 Arkansas Department of Education. All rights reserved. School districts may reproduce these materials for in-school student use only. No resale. Materials may not be reproduced, distributed or sold for commercial use or profit. ADE employees are not authorized to waive these restrictions.

 

 

I Finally Got It!

 

When I was 6 I walked to my friends house that live on my block. I was stunned to see them riding bikes. I couldn’t ride a bike without training wheels. They had an old bike their dad took the training wheels off. That didn’t work out I ran into a tree! I felt left out. People laughed at me. I went home that day crying. That night I decided

I was going to learn how to ride a bike once and for all. The next day I went to my friends house first they let me get on they held on the bike tight gave me a head start a let go my friends taught me. I never got picked on again. And best of all

I never ever had to tag along like my brother does. Now I have races and sometimes win. I have my own bike and go see my friends ever day. That’s how I learned to ride a bike.

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