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Multiple Meaning Words

 

 

Vocabulary

 

Common Core State Standards

• L.K.4 Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on kindergarten reading and content.
a. Identify new meanings for familiar words and apply them accurately.
• L.1.4 Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grade 1 reading and content, choosing flexibly from an array of strategies.
a. Use sentence-level context as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.
• L.2.4 Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grade 2 reading and content, choosing flexibly from an array of strategies.
a. Use sentence-level context as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.
• L.3.4 Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning word and phrases based on grade 3 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.
a. Use sentence-level context as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.
• L.4.4 Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grade 4 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.
a. Use context as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.
• L.5.4 Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grade 5 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.
a. Use context as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.

 

Rationale:

Based on extensive, scientifically based reading research, the National Reading Panel (NICHD, 2000) suggested several implications for vocabulary. Vocabulary should be taught directly even though a great deal of vocabulary is learned indirectly. Effective vocabulary instruction includes teaching new words directly by providing explicit, clearly written definitions, and well–chosen examples and non-examples. Word recognition greatly impacts comprehension.

 

Materials:

  • Sentence strips with words written on them

  • Pictures of words that have multiple meanings

  • Overhead projector

  • Markers

  • Tape

 

Direct Explanation:

Today we are going to learn about multiple meaning words. A multiple meaning word is a word that has more than one meaning. Sometimes multiple meaning words sound alike and are spelled alike. Sometimes multiple meaning words are spelled the same but said differently. We will look at the pictures of the multiple meaning words. Today we will work with ‘bat’, ‘pen’, ‘bark’ and ‘bow’.

We will give a definition in our own words.” (Modifications for second through fourth grade would add words that increase in difficulty and add reading dictionary definitions and sentence writing to the task.)

 

Model:

Let’s look at our first word. It is ‘bat’. What do you think a ‘bat’ might be?” As students say it might be a baseball stick, animal or the action of coming up to bat, show the picture of each. Write a sentence on the sentence strip and read it to the students. Say: “The bat was made of wood.” Pick up the picture that would show the wooden bat. Model thinking aloud and say, “An animal can’t be wooden and going to bat is action, so I think the picture of the baseball bat is correct.” Continue with the other two meanings of bat.

Guided Practice:

Write the ‘student friendly’ definition on the overhead as a student talks about each definition of ‘bat’. Continue with ‘bow’. Discuss the difference in meaning and pronunciation of the multiple meaning word. Continue this process until students have talked about and identified a meaning for each of the multiple meaning words. (As students develop, second through fourth grade may wish to do some of this in written form and have students write the ‘student friendly’ definition.

 

Application:

Divide students into groups and give each group five multiple meaning words. Have a tape of the words used in a sentence and allow students to discuss the differences in meaning and pronunciation.

 

 

Tier II Additions/Accommodations:

  • Students will maintain at their desk a folder with ‘student friendly’ definitions.

  • Implement a peer tutor “buddy” system. Students alternate giving student-

friendly definitions.

  • Student underlines/highlights the target word in assignment.

 

Assessment: Allow students to use a list of student-friendly definitions as they choose the correct picture for the multiple meaning word in a sentence.

 

 

Tier III Modifications:

  • Students develop logograph cards to keep at their desk. A logograph is a

student-drawn picture on an index card with a student-friendly definition.

  • Students focus on the “essential” words, not the whole list.

 

Assessment: Students match only 1 student-friendly definition to the picture of each multiple meaning word.

 

 

Tier IV Modifications:
  • Pre-teach the vocabulary before the whole group lesson

  • Active thinking – have student act out the meanings of the words or give the students pictures of the various meanings, i.e., a hair bow and a boy taking a bow

  • Personal definition of word using pictures, symbols or other concrete methods

  • Use peer buddy to write the responses

 

Assessment: Find the picture or symbol that best represents the word or words.

The student would have a sentence read and would have to select the appropriate picture, i.e., “The girl wore a bow in her hair.”

Tier V Modifications:

  • Pre-teach vocabulary

  • Active thinking – have student act out the meanings of the words or give the students pictures of the various meanings, i.e., a bird for ‘dove’ and someone in the water for ‘dove’.

  • Limit vocabulary presented each time

  • Provide extra practice

  • Daily review

  • Use Minspeak, Unity or electronic input and/or output

  • Have student develop a dictionary of definitions that are at their level

 

Assessment: Find the picture or symbol that best represents the word or words.

The student would be read a sentence and would have to select the appropriate picture, i.e., “The girl wore a hair bow.”

 

 

 

References:

 

Reading First: A Closer Look at the Five Essential Components of Effective

Reading Instruction (2004) Learning Point Associates

 

TPRI Intervention Activities Guide (2004) p. 82 (#7.17)

 

Beers, Kylene (2003) When Kids Can’t Read What Teachers Can Do: A Guide for Teachers 6-12, Heinemann, p. 195-196

 

Copyright © 2006 Arkansas Department of Education. All rights reserved. School districts may reproduce these materials for in-school student use only. No resale. Materials may not be reproduced, distributed or sold for Commercial use or profit. ADE employees are not authorized to waive these restrictions.

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