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K-5 VOCABULARY #2

Explicit Vocabulary With Read Aloud

Grades K-1

 

 

Grades K-1

 

VOCABULARY

 

Common Core State Standards

• L.K.4 Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on kindergarten reading and content.
-Identify new meanings for familiar words and apply them accurately.
• L.K.6 Use words and phrases acquired through conversations, reading and being read to, and responding to texts.
• L.1.4 Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grade 1 reading and content, choosing flexibly from an array of strategies.
-Use sentence-level context as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.
• L.1.6 Use words and phrases acquired through conversations, reading and being read to, and responding to texts, including using frequently occurring conjunctions to simple relationships.

 

 

 

Rationale: (After Read Aloud) Children acquire vocabulary both directly, through explicit instruction, and indirectly, through wide reading and listening. This explicit lesson would take place at the end of a read aloud and discussion of the story. The words chosen are words of high utility and will be found across many different types of texts. (See Bringing Words To Life for instruction on choosing words)

 

 

Materials:

  • Dr. DeSoto by William Steig

  • Index cards

  • Marker

  • Photocopy of book cover

 

 

Direct Explanation: There are some words that you need to really understand the meaning of from Dr. DeSoto. You will be hearing and seeing these words in many other stories that you will read and you will hear these words used by adults in conversation. You will want to use these words in your writing sometimes. The words are timid, morsel, and protect.

 

 

 

Model:

  1. Contextualize the word: “On this page it says, “Being a mouse, he

refused to treat animals dangerous to mice, and it said so on his

sign…They wouldn’t admit even the most timid-looking cat.”

 

  1. Say the word: “ Say that word with me…TIMID.”

 

  1. Student-friendly definition: “If you are timid you are easily frightened and you don’t want to do anything that would be mean or rough or loud. So a timid-looking cat would be a cat that doesn’t look like it would hurt anything and acts like it is afraid of you.”

Examples:

  1.  
    • A little child might be timid about playing soccer with big kids. He might be a little afraid of them.”

    • You might be timid about learning to ride a bicycle and not want to try.”

    • Or you might be timid about talking in front of a lot of people and not want to be in a class play.”

 

Guided Practice:

  1. Student interaction with word: I am going to say some things that

might or might not be an example of someone being timid. If it is true

say, “TIMID”, if it isn’t true, put your thumbs down.”

  • Feeling afraid to sing in front of other people” - TIMID

  • Hiding behind your mother’s legs when she is introducing you to someone” - TIMID

  • Being the first one to volunteer to tryout for a play”

  • Not wanting your teacher to call on you in class” - TIMID

 

5. Say the word: What is the word we’re learning?” TIMID

 

Repeat procedure for words, morsel and protect:

 

morsel

1. Contextualize the word: “On this page it says, “…he realized he had a

tasty little morsel in his mouth” (Dr. DeSoto was in his mouth.)

2. Say the word: MORSEL

3. Definitions and examples:

A morsel is a small piece of food, something tiny like a piece of popcorn, a cookie crumb or a chocolate chip or a raisin.

4. Student Interaction:

  • Can you think of something that would be a morsel of food? When I call on you, say, “A morsel of food would be…”

  • Now turn to the person next to you and tell your example of a morsel.”

5. Say the word: “What’s the word we are learning?” MORSEL

 

protect:

1. Contextualize the word: “Here it says, “We must do something to protect

ourselves.”

  1. Say the word: PROTECT

  2. Definition and examples:

Protect means to keep away from harm or injury. I protect myself from

the cold by wearing my coat and gloves. Or I protect my little brother

from getting hurt by making sure he doesn’t go out into the street.”

  1. Student Interaction:

  • Think of a way that you could protect something or someone. When I call on you, say, “I could protect…….by…..” Call on two or three students for their statements.

  • If what I say next is an example of protecting something or someone,

say PROTECT. If it isn’t, don’t say anything.”

  •  
    • Locking your car door” PROTECT

    • Not wearing your seatbelt”.

    • Holding your little brother’s hand as you cross the street” PROTECT

    • Not wearing a bicycle helmet when you ride in the street”

5. Say the word: “What’s the word?” PROTECT

 

Use all the words in a sentence: “Even though the rabbit was timid, she wanted to protect her baby bunny in the garden until he could finish eating the morsel of lettuce.”

 

 

Tier I Application/Assessment:

  • Analyze students’ writings for use of new vocabulary words

  • Teacher-made vocabulary test (matching, fill-in-the blank, use in a sentence, etc.)

 

Words have to be used repeatedly to be firmly in memory. One way to help them with this is to have a place in the room where you keep these words on the wall. Photocopy the cover of the book and place the words on index cards next to the book cover. As other books are read, their covers and vocabulary words are also posted. Refer to these words as you talk about other stories and content areas. When words are clearly posted, you will refer to them more often.

 

Encourage students to use these words in their writing by putting their names on sticky notes and placing them on or near the word cards when you’ve noticed that they’ve used them in their writing.

 

Another idea is to have a Word Wizard poster (see Bringing Words To Life) where children’s names are listed and the words they find in other texts, that are the same as the vocabulary words, can be written on sticky notes and placed beside the child’s name on the poster.

Tier II Additions/Accommodations: (same as Lesson #1)

  • Preferential seating with continuous monitoring

  • Close proximity to teacher with eye contact

  • Student copies the word onto the word card for the class or for placing on his/her own desk

  • Restate the student-friendly definition in a different way

  • While looking at the word on the board, the student will spell the word orally and write the word on a partner’s back

  • Pair-share with a partner, then share with the large group

  • Initiate a vocabulary parade: 1) students describe a costume for a word,

2) design a costume to represent the vocabulary word, 3) have a vocabulary parade

  • Read books that have these same vocabulary words in the text

  • Small group activities:

  • Visualize by describing the scene from the story before talking again about the definition (“Picture in your mind the mother mouse being so tired that she was lying on her bed like this…” and act out),

  • Draw a picture of the word meaning in a vocabulary journal

  • Quickly review word meaning and restate student examples

  • Encourage the use of vocabulary words when student writes

 

Tier II Application/Assessment:

  • Change input and/or output format for vocabulary test, i.e., oral response

  • Modified test format, i.e., multiple choice, fewer response choices in matching

 

 

Tier III Modifications:

  • After listening to other students’ examples and given two choices of examples, allow student to choose the one that fits the meaning of the word

  • Give student vocabulary word cards in a plastic bag (word bag to be kept in student pocket folder for later one-on-one work)

  • When working one-on-one, allow student to give definitions of the words using personal experiences to check for comprehension of vocabulary words

  • Allow student to write the word on a board, or other writing medium

  • Ask student to form a visual image of vocabulary word meanings as part of discussion, small group or one-on-one

  • Keep the student focused through questioning in the whole group session

  • Praise the student’s participation

  • Allow the student to use magnetic letters, letter tiles, felt letters or letter cards to spell the vocabulary words (word cards made available for spelling issues), and then, orally share the words with others

  • If needed, use play dough, wikki sticks, tubs of sand or similar tactile instruments to write the words

 

 

Tier III Assessment:

Given two choices, allow student to choose correct response demonstrating comprehension of vocabulary word.

 

 

Tier IV Modifications:

  • Use any previously listed accommodation and/or modification needed by the student

  • In a small group setting pre-teach the meanings of target words

  • Abstract words may take more practice, pre-teaching and more examples than the more concrete words

  • Allow student to use all senses to learn a word, for example, some words are best learned by using motor movements (walk versus gallop), some through smell (aroma versus odor) and some through touch (cool versus icy)

  • With the aid of a peer, paraprofessional, parent volunteer or teacher, have student build a vocabulary notebook that may include pictures, icons, drawings and/or objects to help him/her remember the word

  • Teach a context for the word

 

Tier IV Assessment:

Given two choices, allow student to choose correct response demonstrating comprehension of vocabulary word, i.e., “The cookies had a wonderful aroma. The garbage had a wonderful aroma.”

 

 

Tier V Modifications:

  • Use any previously listed accommodation and/or modification needed by the student

  • In a small group or 1:1 setting pre-teach the meaning of target words

  • Abstract vocabulary may need experiential learning for the student to understand the meaning of the target word

  • Allow student to use all senses to learn a word, for example, some words are best learned by using motor movements (walk versus gallop), some through smell (aroma versus odor) and some through touch (cool versus icy)

  • Start with a few words at a time

  • With the aid of a peer, paraprofessional, parent volunteer or teacher, have student build a vocabulary notebook that may include pictures, icons, drawings and/or objects to help student remember the word

  • Teach a context for the word

 

Tier V Assessment:

  • Allow student to match word with meaning of the word

  • Allow student to dictate a short paragraph of 2 to 4 sentences using target word(s)

 

Explicit Vocabulary #2 With Read Aloud

 

References:

Beck, McKeown, and Kucan (2002) Bringing Words to Life: Robust Vocabulary Instruction, The Guilford Press

 

Put Reading First, U. S. Department of Education

 

Copyright © 2006 Arkansas Department of Education. All rights reserved. School districts may reproduce these materials for in-school student use only. No resale. Materials may not be reproduced, distributed or sold for Commercial use or profit. ADE employees are not authorized to waive these restrictions.

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