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K-4 Spelling #5

Doubling and e-Drop with ing

Grades 3-4

 

 

Common Core State Standards

• RF.3.3 Know and apply grade-level phonics and word analysis skills in decoding words.
              c. Decode multisyllable words.
              d. Read grade-appropriate irregularly spelled words.
• L.3.2 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
              e. Use conventional spelling for high-frequency and other studied words and for adding suffixes to base words.
              f. Use spelling patterns and generalizations in writing words.
• RF.4.3 Know and apply grade-level phonics and word analysis skills in decoding words.
              a. Use combined knowledge of all letter-sound correspondences, syllabication patterns, and morphology to read accurately                           unfamiliar multisyllabic words in context and out of context.
• L.4.2 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
              d. Spell grade-appropriate words correctly, consulting references as needed.
• RF.5.3 Know and apply grade-level phonics and word analysis skills in decoding words.
              e. Use combined knowledge of all letter-sound correspondences, syllabication patterns, and morphology (e.g., roots and affixes)                   to read accurately unfamiliar multisyllabic words in context and out of context.
• L.5.2 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
              e. Spell grade-appropriate words correctly, consulting references as needed.

 

Rationale

Students usually have more difficulty with the issue of doubling consonants to mark short vowels than with e-dropping. The doubling principle applies to syllable junctures within words (butter not buter) as well as to the juncture between a base word and a suffix (planned not planed). However, its use is more consistent in the latter.

 

Materials

  • Pocket chart

  • Set of word cards for the sort (drifting, hunting, hopping clipping, missing, fanning, dropping, rubbing, jumping, hoping, smiling, meeting, waiting, riding, tuning, voting, fooling, shouting dragging)

  • Student copies of word cards,

  • Small plastic bags for student word card storage.

  • Student word study notebooks

 

Direct Explanation

Today we are going to study another way words work when ‘ing’ is added. Some

words need to have the last consonant doubled before adding the ‘ing’. How will

we know when we need to do that? Today we will sort some of those words and

discover how we know when to double the last consonant.”

 

Model

1. First, do a “word walk” with the word cards to make sure that these words

are familiar and readable for students. Have students read cards aloud, as

you show them, one at a time.

 

  1. Next, model a word sort according to vowel sounds, short, long, and other. Hold up each word card under the key word category name (short, long, other) saying the word clearly and modeling where you would put it, according to vowel sound. After thinking aloud and placing several cards in their categories ask the students to help choose the categories for the rest of the words and place them in those categories. When this sort is complete, it should look like this:

 

 

 

Short Long Other

 

drifting hoping fooling

hunting smiling shouting

hopping meeting

clipping waiting

missing riding

fanning tuning

dropping voting

rubbing

jumping

dragging

 

  1. Ask, “What do you notice about the words in the short vowel category?” (some have double consonants, some don’t…why?) “What do you notice about the words in the long vowel category?” (the ‘e’ is gone and ‘ing’ is added-no doubling) “What do you notice about the words in the other category?” (they don’t have regular short or long vowel sounds and they don’t have double consonants).

 

  1. Next, resort the words into the following categories for visual pattern; CVC, CVCC, CVVC, and CVCe, using the same procedure (teacher sorts the first several, then asks for student participation in choosing categories).

 

  1. Say,” Now let’s take a closer look at the spelling patterns we can see in these words.” When this sort is complete, it should look like this:

CVC CVCC CVVC CVCe

hopping jumping meeting hoping

clipping hunting groaning smiling

fanning missing waiting riding

dropping drifting fooling tuning

rubbing shouting voting

dragging

 

  1. Ask the question.What do you notice about the words in the CVC category?” (all of them have double consonants).

 

  1. What do you notice about the CVCC category?” (no change in the words + ing) .

 

  1. Ask, “What do you notice about the CVVC words?” (no change + ing).

 

  1. Ask, “What do you see in the CVCe words?” (e-drop +ing).

 

  1. Ask, “ How do we know when to double the consonants before adding ing?” (When the words have only one vowel before the last consonant you double that consonant. This is the teaching point of the lesson).

 

  1. Now, resort the words into the categories, no change, e-drop, and double. This sums up the learning. Follow the same procedure (teacher sorts the first several cards, then students help pick the category). When this sort is complete, it should look like this:

 

 

No Change e-drop double

jumping hoping hopping

waiting tuning clipping

meeting smiling dragging

drifting riding fanning

shouting voting rubbing

missing dropping

gooling

hunting

 

Here’s a great way to remember this principle: Do the “1-1-1”-check. Ask yourself

three questions:

1. Does the word have 1 syllable?

2. Does the word have 1 vowel?

3. Does the word end with 1 consonant?

If the answer to all three questions is ‘yes’, you double the last consonant.”

 

Guided Practice

With a buddy, students will do their own word sorting by vowel sounds, CVC,

CVCC,CVVC, CVCe, and then no change, e-drop, and double with their own word cards. They will record the no change, e-drop, and double sort in their word study notebooks. They will also record their discoveries about the spelling principle learned. Teacher will circulate in the classroom, observing and prompting for thinking.

 

Independent Practice

On following days, the students will resort for no change, e-drop, and double

with their words cards. They will engage in other independent activities using

those words and that spelling principle. These activities might include:

  • Speed Sort: With a timer set, the teacher sorts the word cards reasonably fast. Then the students try to beat the teacher’s time with their own sorts. A variation would be to have buddies take turns timing each other.

  • Word Hunts: Students search through material they are currently reading to find additional words with the doubling principle. They record these words in their word study journals and on a chart in the classroom.

  • Write and Draw: In their word study journal, students write sentences using words from the double category. They also draw a picture that illustrates the sentence. A variation would be to draw

They may take a separate copy of the word sort home for independent practice.

 

Assessment

A weekly assessment will be given in the form of a spelling test. The teacher will

randomly choose ten words from the categories ( more from the double category)

and say the word, use it in a sentence, and say the word again. The students will

write the words. If the students learned the doubling principle, they will be able to

spell the words.

 

Tier II Additions

  • Allow student to use alternative methods rather than writing.

  • Allow student to develop a word bank to provide a consistent model.

 

Tier II Assessment

With appropriate accommodations, student will do a weekly assessment in the form of a spelling test. The teacher will randomly choose ten words from the categories (more from the double category) and say the word, use it in a sentence, and say the word again. The students will write the words. If the students learned the doubling principle, they will be able to spell the words. Assessment should also include correct use of the words and spelling principle in student writing. Student may be given fewer words.

 

Tier III Accommodations/Modifications

  • Allow student to use alternative method rather than writing.

  • Provide student with a word bank to have a consistent model to remind them of the 1-1-1 rule.

  • Give student fewer words to spell – from three to seven choices.

  • Give student only two of the rules each time they are given a practice.

 

Tier III Assessments

Give test with fewer words on the test and allow student to use word bank on assessment. Plus, allow student to have access to the rules during the assessment and test on one set of rules at a time.

 

Tier IV Modifications

  • Allow student to use alternative method rather than writing.

  • Provide student with a word bank to have a consistent model to remind them of the 1-1-1 rule.

  • Give student fewer words to spell – from two to four choices.

  • Give student only two of the rules each time they are given a practice.

 

 

 

Tier IV Assessments

Give test with fewer words on the test and allow student to use word bank on assessment. Plus, allow student to have access to the rules during the assessment and test on one set of rules at a time.

 

 

Tier V Modifications

  • Student may have difficulty with the abstract concept of CVC,

  • Teach the pattern with actual words as opposed to teaching the rule in the abstract. Student may have difficulty with the abstract concept of CVC,

CVCC,CVVC, CVCe

  • Teach the rule once the student has learned the pattern.

  • Teach one pattern at a time.

  • Provide student with a word bank to have a consistent model to remind them of the 1-1-1 rule.

  • Allow student extra practice time, although each session may need to be shortened in length of time.

  • Have student work with a paraprofessional, parent volunteer or teacher to ensure positive practice.

 

Tier V Assessments

Give test with fewer words on the test and allow student to use word bank on assessment. Plus, allow student to have access to the rules during the assessment and test on one set of rules at a time.

 

Resource

Word Journeys, Ganske (2000)

 

Copyright © 2006 Arkansas Department of Education. All rights reserved. School districts may reproduce these materials for in-school student use only. No resale. Materials may not be reproduced, distributed or sold for commercial use or profit. ADE employees are not authorized to waive these restrictions.

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