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K-5 Oral Language #2

Telling A Personal Narrative

 

 

Oral Language

 

Common Core State Standards
• SL.K.4 Describe familiar people, places, things, and events, and, with prompting and support, provide additional detail.
• SL.1.4 Describe people, places, things, and events with relevant details, expressing ideas and feelings clearly.
• SL.2.4 Tell a story or recount an experience with appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details, speaking audibly in coherent sentences.
• SL.3.4 Report on a topic or text, tell a story, or recount an experience with appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details, speaking clearly at an understandable pace.
• SL.4.4 Report on a topic or text, tell a story, or recount an experience in an organized manner, using appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details to support main ideas or themes; speak clearly at an understandable pace.
• SL.5.4 Report on a topic or text or present and opinion, sequencing ideas logically and using appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details to support main ideas or themes; speak clearly at an understandable pace.

 

Rationale

Narrative is a complex and demanding form that is mastered at different rates and to different degrees by different individuals. Oral narratives may include a series of events told as a story. The structure usually includes a setting, characters involved, a complication, and a resolution. The easiest form of narrative is relating personal experiences with a simple structure, based on a sequence of events. This requires that children be able to mentally sequence events from beginning to end. Children who have opportunities to share oral stories develop effective listening and speaking skills and will be able to approach printed texts with a degree of familiarity and understanding about story structure, language, and pattern.

 

Materials

None

 

Direct Explanation

All of us have stories in our heads of things that have happened to us. Sharing our own stories of real things that have happened helps us is fun and helps others know more about us. Telling our story also helps us think about how we might write it down, if we want to. I want you to listen to my story and be thinking of something that might have happened to you that is kind of like what I am going to tell you.

Model

I am going to tell you a story of something that happened to me when I was only nine years old. Then the teacher will proceed to tell a simple childhood memory story, emphasizing the sequencing words like first, next, then, finally and etc.

 

Guided Practice

Now, turn to your partner and tell your own story of a time when

something like that happened to you. Your partner will listen carefully and

tell you what he/she thinks about what your story.. Then, take turns and let your

partner tell you his/her story. You listen carefully and then tell your partner what

you think about his/her story. Ask for volunteers to tell their stories.

 

Independent Practice

Without the teacher modeling a personal narrative, have students take turns with a partner and tell a story about something that happened to them that is related to a teacher-chosen topic. For instance, a time when they were doing something dangerous, or when they were very, very happy, or a time when they were very brave, etc.

 

Assessment

Teacher observation of paired students telling personal stories.

 

Tier II Additions

  • Pre-teach the meanings of dangerous, happy, brave, etc.

  • Allow student more time to give their personal narrative

  • Allow student to first develop their narrative using an alternate method; such as, making a cartoon, drawing a picture, making a collage or by demonstrating the narrative through movement

 

Tier II Assessment

Same as Tier I with the additions

 

 

Tier III Accommodations/Modifications

  • Pre-teach the meanings of dangerous, happy, brave, etc.

  • Allow student more time to give their personal narrative

  • Allow student to first develop their narrative using an alternate method; such as making a cartoon, drawing a picture, making a collage or by demonstrating the narrative through movement

  • Allow students extra practice time

 

 

Assessment

Allow students to give their narrative using alternative method along with the oral narrative

 

Tier IV Modifications
  • Pre-teach the meanings of dangerous, happy, brave, etc.

  • Simplify the language of the example narratives given

  • Allow student to first develop their narrative using an alternate method, such as making a cartoon, drawing a picture, making a collage or by demonstrating the narrative through movement

  • Use the support personnel to provide extra time and practice in developing their narratives

 

Assessment

Student should be allowed to give narrative in simple language supported by the alternative method

 

Tier V Modifications

 

  • Pre-teach the meanings of dangerous, happy, brave, etc.

  • Simplify the language of the example narratives given

  • Allow students to use augmentative/alternative communication systems

  • Use peer buddies to tell narrative of joint activity with the Tier V student supplying picture/icon or other indicator of event in narrative

 

 

Assessment

Have peer system and assess the Tier V student on their ability to correctly support the oral narrative given by the speaking student or allow the Tier V student to be assessed using augmentative/alternative communication

 

Resources

Education Department of Western Australia (2004). Oral Language Developmental Continuum. Salem, MA: Steps Professional Development & Consulting

 

Education Department of Western Australia (2004). Oral Language Resource Book. Salem, MA: Steps Professional Development & Consulting

 

Gentile, Lance M. (2003). The Oracy Instructional Guide. Carlsbad, CA: Dominie Press, Inc.

 

 

Copyright © 2006 Arkansas Department of Education. All rights reserved. School districts may reproduce these materials for in-school student use only. No resale. Materials may not be reproduced, distributed or sold for commercial use or profit. ADE employees are not authorized to waive these restrictions.

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