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Lesson Four


 

Essential Element: Writing (Expository)

 

Framework(s):

  • W.5.5.3-8.3 Create expository, narrative, descriptive, and persuasive

writings

  • W.5.5.10-8.10 Write across the curriculum

  • W.4.5.2-8.2 Organize ideas by using such graphic organizers as webbing,

mapping, charts/graphs, Venn diagrams, and formal outlining

with main topics, subtopics, and details

  • W.4.5.3 Demonstrate an awareness of purpose and audience with

emphasis on expository and letter writing

  • W.4.6.3 Demonstrate an awareness of purpose and audience for all

modes of written discourse

  • W.4.7.3-8.3 Determine/select a focus and an organizational structure

based on purpose, audience, length, and required format

for expository, narrative, and descriptive writing

  • W.4.5.6-6.6 Organize expository paragraphs that include a topic

sentence, supporting details, and a concluding sentence

 

 

Rationale:

Expository writing is the most common type of writing used in high school and college. This type of writing explains or organizes a topic by using examples and specific details. By synthesizing, the student gathers information from other sources and relates it to what is being studied in the classroom. Using these strategies, the student will develop the skills needed for analysis.

 

 

Materials

  • Texts

  • Paper and pencil

  • Whiteboard

 

 

Direct Explanation:

We have almost completed our unit on the Revolutionary War. Today we are going to begin to develop an expository paragraph about the similarities between the British and the colonists. An expository paragraph explains or analyzes a topic by giving examples or specific details.”

 

 

 

 

 

Model:

I am going to get you started. On the board I have drawn three columns. The first column is labeled The British, the second column is labeled Similarities, and the third column is labeled The Colonists. Under each column, we are going to start a list of the characteristics of each subject. When you find a characteristic that is common to both, it will go under Similarities.”

 

 

Guided Practice:

Let’s look at the columns and record a couple of examples to get us started.” (Teacher or students record class suggestions.)

 

 

Application:

We’ve started our lists and now your assignment is to complete the columns with as many examples as you can, using what you’ve learned in this unit. You can refer back to the unit chapters for more information. Once you’ve completed your lists, let me review it and then you will use your list to write an expository paragraph comparing and contrasting the British and the Colonists. We will continue this tomorrow.”

 

 

Assessment: Create a rubric that evaluates the components of expository writing.

 

 

Tier II Additions/Accommodations:

  • Work in groups of two or three to develop the lists

  • Extended time outside of class to complete the assignment

 

Assessment: Same as Tier I

 

 

Tier III Modifications:

  • Provide a mixed list of characteristics for the student to place under the correct column

  • Work with a peer, paraprofessional or other adult to complete the assignment

 

Assessment: Create a modified rubric that includes brainstorming and rough draft.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tier IV Modifications:

  • Provide a mixed list (using pictures/icons rather than written words) of characteristics for the student to place under the correct column

  • Work with a peer, paraprofessional or other adult to complete the assignment – Allow extra time

 

Assessment: Create a modified rubric that includes brainstorming and rough draft.

 

 

Tier V Modifications:

  • Using pictures/icons or drawings, with the aid of a paraprofessional, peer, parent volunteer, or teacher, have the student develop a mind map, chart or web of a particular lesson.

 

Assessment: Using a rubric assess the student’s web, mind map or chart for information from lesson.

 

 

 

References:

 

Levin, M. (2004) Expository Writing, Westminster, CA: Teacher Created Materials

 

Harvey, S., and Goudvis, A. (2000) Strategies That Work, Portsmouth, NH: Stenhouse Publishing

 

Copyright © 2006 Arkansas Department of Education. All rights reserved. School districts may reproduce these materials for in-school student use only. No resale. Materials may not be reproduced, distributed or sold for Commercial use or profit. ADE employees are not authorized to waive these restrictions.

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