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Lesson Three


 

Essential Element: Oral Language (Oral and Visual Communication)

 

Framework(s):

  • OV.1.5.4 Demonstrate appropriate eye contact

  • OV.1.6.4 Demonstrate appropriate eye contact and posture

  • OV.1.7.4-8.4 Demonstrate appropriate eye contact, posture, and volume

  • OV.1.5.5-OV.1.8.5 Use appropriate pronunciation and inflection to

communicate ideas and information

 

Rationale:

Much of communication is non-verbal. Maintaining appropriate eye contact and posture help students convey the intended meaning. In many instances, how things are said is more important than what is said. Tier I and II children should be able to accomplish this with little or no direct instruction but if individuals in your class are not showing appropriate eye contact and posture you can embed these strategies in another lesson like Reader’s Theater. For the tier III, IV, and V children, hopefully they are receiving specialized therapy to help with these skills. The following strategies may help in the regular classroom.

 

Materials:

  • Enough room to divide into groups of 3-4

  • Index cards with sentences printed on them

  • Index cards with faces

 

Direct Explanation/Modeling:

Today we are going to discuss how to change the meaning of sentences by your expression. If you are not maintaining good eye contact, you will not get what the speaker is trying to say. Let me show you an example. I will say the exact same sentence three different times and the sentence will have three different meanings. Get ready and listen.”

 

You went to your room!” (Mad)

You went to your room!” (Shock)

You went to your room.” (Funny)

 

When you maintain appropriate eye contact, you make sure your audience understands your point because you have your listener’s attention.”

 

Guided/Independent Practice:

Now let’s do an activity. If you will get in groups of three to four, then we will say the sentences on the cards. The audience will write the meaning of your sentence after you have said it – writing either mad, funny, or shock. When it is your turn to talk, you can only say the sentence on the card.”

 

Sentences (Say the sentence in either a mad, funny, or shocking manner.)

 

He got out early.

Sarah is not home.

The box is on the table.

My computer is not here.

John is out of candy.

 

Tier II Additions/Accommodations:

  • Have the student do an echo with a teacher model for each of the sentences.

 

Assessment: Do a teacher observation to see if the student maintains appropriate eye contact while presenting and watching a presenter. A rubric to guide in assessing the student during the observation could be an option.

 

Tier III Modifications:

1. Tell the student “This is the mad sentence.” and have a picture card with a mad face. Then explain why that is mad (narrow eyes, frown). Follow the same procedure for the funny and shock faces.

 

2. Have the student use a “buddy” to model the appropriate inflection.

3. Read a short story that emphasizes one emotion.

Assessment:

  • Do a teacher observation to see if the student maintains appropriate eye contact while presenting and watching a presenter. A rubric to guide in assessing the student during the observation could be an option.

  • Have the student identify each emotion of the presenter with the help of the index cards (if needed).

 

Tier IV Modifications:

  1. Tell the student “This is the mad sentence.” and have a picture card with a mad face. Then explain why that is mad (narrow eyes, frown).

  2. Follow the same procedure for the funny and shock faces. Teaching only one concept at a time.

 

  1. Have the student use a “buddy” to model the appropriate inflection. Do multiple repetitions of each emotion.

  2. Read a short story that emphasizes one emotion.

 

Assessment:

  • Do a teacher observation to see if the student maintains appropriate eye contact while presenting and watching a presenter. A rubric to guide in assessing the student during the observation could be an option.

  • Have the student identify each emotion of the presenter with the help of the index cards (if needed).

 

Tier V Modifications:

  1. Tell the student “This is the mad sentence.” and have a picture card with a mad face. Then explain why that is mad (narrow eyes, frown)

  2. Follow the same procedure for the funny...

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Have the student use a “buddy” to model the appropriate inflection. Do multiple repetitions of each emotion.

  2. Read sentence that has one emotion and show emotion to student.

Assessment:

  • A rubric to guide in assessing the student during the observation could be an option.

  • Have the student identify each emotion of the presenter with the help of the index cards (if needed).

 

 

Reference:

Carlisle, J., Reasoning and Reading, Educators Publishing Service, p.48

 

Copyright © 2006 Arkansas Department of Education. All rights reserved. School districts may reproduce these materials for in-school student use only. No resale. Materials may not be reproduced, distributed or sold for Commercial use or profit. ADE employees are not authorized to waive these restrictions.

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